0044 117 908 6102 clare@novaassociates.co.uk

From Concern to Shock 

I became increasingly concerned when one of my clients kept putting off Mental Health First Aid Training for their managers. Each time we spoke, they acknowledged the importance of these skills for their managers but they would say, “But we don’t have the budget right now…” 

My concern turned to shock when they reached out to me with devastating news— one of their senior managers had taken his own life. 

Were you aware it’s World Suicide Prevention Day this Sunday 10th September 2023?  

The Ripple Effect 

The knock-on effect on the company of losing a senior member of a team sent shockwaves across the organisation. The ripple effect of shock and grief was tremendous, affecting the lives of many people within the company. 

Even if we are not personally connected to the individual who took their own life, we may find ourselves feeling unsettled, distressed, and unsure of how to support others during such a challenging time. 

Managers: 5 Ways to Support Someone Bereaved by Suicide

Dealing with Feelings of Guilt 

For many, this tragic event becomes the point of no return, affecting not only the person who died but also their families and friends.  

We often grapple with questions like: 

What could we have done to prevent that person from reaching that point?  

How could I have helped?  

How could I have spotted the signs?  

Did I put too much pressure on them? 

Why didn’t I ease their workload more?  

How can we support our team if they have been exposed to someone taking their own life, whether a work colleague, a friend, a family member, or even an acquaintance? The consequences are far-reaching, affecting people on many levels. 

A Suicide Assessment Therapist’s Viewpoint 

Khara Crosswaite Brindle, a suicide assessment therapist, sheds light on how to honour the memory of those lost to suicide, rather than dwelling on the method. You can watch her full interview about the Story of Suicide on the Mental Health Chats YouTube and Podcast. 

Khara, drawing from personal experience, helps others understand how to support themselves and those around them when faced with such a tragedy. 

Dealing with Feelings of Guilt 

For many, this tragic event becomes the point of no return, affecting not only the person who died but also their families and friends.  

We often grapple with questions like: 

What could we have done to prevent that person from reaching that point?  

How could I have helped?  

How could I have spotted the signs?  

Did I put too much pressure on them? 

Why didn’t I ease their workload more?  

How can we support our team if they have been exposed to someone taking their own life, whether a work colleague, a friend, a family member, or even an acquaintance? The consequences are far-reaching, affecting people on many levels. 

A Suicide Assessment Therapist’s Viewpoint 

Khara Crosswaite Brindle, a suicide assessment therapist, sheds light on how to honour the memory of those lost to suicide, rather than dwelling on the method. You can watch her full interview about the Story of Suicide on the Mental Health Chats YouTube and Podcast. 

Khara, drawing from personal experience, helps others understand how to support themselves and those around them when faced with such a tragedy. 

Dealing with Feelings of Guilt 

For many, this tragic event becomes the point of no return, affecting not only the person who died but also their families and friends.  

We often grapple with questions like: 

What could we have done to prevent that person from reaching that point?  

How could I have helped?  

How could I have spotted the signs?  

Did I put too much pressure on them? 

Why didn’t I ease their workload more?  

How can we support our team if they have been exposed to someone taking their own life, whether a work colleague, a friend, a family member, or even an acquaintance? The consequences are far-reaching, affecting people on many levels. 

A Suicide Assessment Therapist’s Viewpoint 

Khara Crosswaite Brindle, a suicide assessment therapist, sheds light on how to honour the memory of those lost to suicide, rather than dwelling on the method. You can watch her full interview about the Story of Suicide on the Mental Health Chats YouTube and Podcast. 

Khara, drawing from personal experience, helps others understand how to support themselves and those around them when faced with such a tragedy. 

Managers: 5 Ways to Support Someone Bereaved by Suicide

Here are 5 ways for managers to support others in their team who have been bereaved by suicide:  

1. Make time to check how they are. This does not have to be in the office. You may go for a walk, or a coffee. This is crucial in showing them that they are not alone and that their feelings are valid. This can be done in a way that feels comfortable and natural for them. 

2. Give them time to tell their story. It’s about creating a safe space where they can share their feelings, memories, and experiences related to the loss.  

3. Be present and listen. Listen attentively without interrupting or trying to impose your own feelings or experiences. It’s important to understand that being present is more than just physical presence. It’s about being mentally and emotionally available to them. 

4. Don’t judge them. Their grief, reactions, and coping mechanisms can vary greatly, and it’s important to remember that there’s no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to grieve. 

5. Remember, grief has no time limits. They may feel fine one day but then be triggered on another day. People cope with grief differently, and it’s not linear. It’s important to understand that healing from grief doesn’t mean forgetting about the loss but learning to live with it. 

Seeking Support 

Numerous charities, including The Samaritans, offer helplines for individuals experiencing suicidal thoughts. For more information, visit their website at www.samaritans.org

Spotting the Signs 

I run programmes programs for managers covering a variety of topics, including identifying signs of mental health concerns, engaging in confident mental health conversations, and managing workplace stress and well-being.  

Don’t wait for someone you know to take their own life, to shake up the way you approach your team’s mental health.  

The more time you invest in emotional resilience early on, the more prepared your team will be to handle life-changing events.  

If these are areas that your team needs right now, schedule a strategy call with me here, and let’s discuss how you can empower your managers to develop a positive mental health culture within your organisation.  

By addressing mental health proactively, we can better support our teams and mitigate the devastating consequences of suicide within our workplaces and communities.